Aaron Priest Photography
 
2013-12-27-184762

Aaron D. Priest

Timelapses and Panoramas of Maine
Gigapixel & Spherical Panoramas
4K Timelapses
Night Photography
Virtual Tours
Real Estate / Architecture

Latest News!

Next month I'm teaming up with Acadia Images Photography Workshops and Matt Pollock as an instructor of night sky photography in Maine’s beautiful Acadia National Park. During this comprehensive 3 day and 3 night workshop we will show you how to identify features of the night sky during the various seasons, shoot the Milky Way, constellations, and star trails, and go over post-processing of your RAW files into finished images. Accommodations are included at our private guesthouse.

Visit this page for more details, including recommended equipment:
http://acadiaimages.com/2014-workshops/night-sky-2014/

I hope to see you there!


Recently, I did a re-edit of my 360° vortex star trails from the Bold Coast, called “StarBurst”. I aligned the hundreds of night sky panoramas and removed the rotation before stacking the star trails, to get straight zoomed trails across the entire sky. Facing north it looks like a star burst, and looking south it looks like a meteor shower over the ocean! Roundme featured my vortex star trails as their “Space of the Week” in June, so this week they did a follow-up interview about my spherical panoramas. It was a fun interview with some great questions! I talked some about how I got started in panoramic photography, my thought process and workflow when shooting a sphere, and my plans for future projects I’m working on--enjoy! And thanks for the opportunity Roundme!

http://blog.round.me/post/95100591663/space-of-the-week-starburst-by-panoramic


New timelapse video!

I took this a few nights ago of my kids camping in our back yard. I set up my camera to point north for some circular star trails, and maybe a chance of aurora overnight. It was a very clear night. In the beginning of the timelapse you can see the kids running around with their glow sticks as we setup the tent. Andromeda is visible next to the northern end of the Milky Way. Cassiopeia is in the middle of the Milky Way. The kids have a toy that projects stars on the ceiling and walls that we wanted to try out in the tent when they went to bed. It slowly rotates through a few different colors. Sped up in the timelapse video it looks more like disco lights though! The rest of the lights in the tent are from the kids’ glow sticks. Pleiades shows up briefly on the right side in the middle of the timelapse, but goes out of frame after a few seconds. The bright star that rises out of the trees afterwards is Capella. There was a little bit of green airglow in the early morning hours, but no real aurora.


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